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Pedestrians become chief victims of road accident deaths in 2008

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  • MeanRingo at 12:16 PM JST - 29th January

    Wow, drop the geriatric license provisions. And don't let them walk the streets. Those are some spectacular numbers.

  • Number11 at 12:25 PM JST - 29th January

    That leaves 1,724 other people who aren't mentioned.

    Shouldn't this story be that pedestrian deaths outnumbered passenger deaths, and traffic deaths for drivers, passengers and pedestrians are almost equally split at one-third each?

  • Nessie at 12:47 PM JST - 29th January

    Pedestrians -- 1/3 Vehicle occupants (driver or passenger) -- 1/3

    So what's the other 1/3?

  • Nessie at 12:48 PM JST - 29th January

    Maybe the remaining third is pachinko-steamed babies.

  • disorientated at 02:08 PM JST - 29th January

    Its seems to me that there is an unspoken rule in Japan that the larger the vehicle you drive, the more priority you have. Put that together with the fact that both cars and pedestrians share the same green light at junctions... and that 'give way' seems to be an alien concept(not everybody, but in my opinion a good portion) Is it any wonder. Jogging used to be so much fun

  • dennis0bauer at 03:30 PM JST - 29th January

    How about the rule that drivers are always at fault needs to be changed so there are less hit & runs?

  • likeitis at 03:45 PM JST - 29th January

    I think the headline should read more like: Number of people who apparently cannot see or hear a car coming at record number in 2008.

    Must times, you got have your head really far up your backside to get hit by a car. Its not like they stalk you in the woods and jump out from behind trees all of a sudden. They travel on set paths called "roadways" which are generally free of places a car might try to hide, cars are big and they are noisy. Stay out their path if you do not want death or serious injury.

    This is like having people randomly run across frozen ponds, and blaming the ice for breaking sometimes.

  • Harry_Gatto at 04:07 PM JST - 29th January

    likeitis - good post. The typical Japanese pedestrian (and cyclists in Japan - note the careful wording) has the brains of a rocking horse. If they don't have their face stuck in their keitai then their brain is definitely some place else.

  • Nessie at 04:12 PM JST - 29th January

    Must times, you got have your head really far up your backside to get hit by a car. Its not like they stalk you in the woods and jump out from behind trees all of a sudden. They travel on set paths called "roadways" which are generally free of places a car might try to hide, cars are big and they are noisy. Stay out their path if you do not want death or serious injury.

    More often than not they don't stop at the stop lines of side streets, so it kinda is like they jump out all of a sudden.

  • likeitis at 04:17 PM JST - 29th January

    More often than not they don't stop at the stop lines of side streets, so it kinda is like they jump out all of a sudden.

    But if one thought walking out on the street was a good idea because one thought the white line would protect one, or perhaps the green walking man, one would have one's head up one's backside. It is no mystery that sometimes cars don't stop. Prepare for it. Its easy.

  • likeitis at 04:23 PM JST - 29th January

    Not sure if you have ever been in the countryside in Japan – or even in the suburbs. Cars frequently speed along roads that are ill-lit, where there are no sidewalks and frequently no place for a pedestrian to jump – given the presence of a retaining wall, a ditch, etc.

    Been all over Japan. The very situation you describe is why I said "most times". What you describe is one of the few times it might not have been preventable by the pedestrian. But me, being able bodied, will, have and do a lot to protect myself, including walking on farmland, jumping over guardrails, and turning around and flapping my arms so that approaching cars see me there. I am also known to take the long way if its safer, or wait for cars to pass before entering a narrow stretch of road.

    If saving one's own life is deemed an "inconvenience" I hesitate to consider that person a victim except of their own laziness.

  • Wakarimasen at 04:56 PM JST - 29th January

    Pedestrians in Japan arev indeed in a league of their own for poor judgement and failure to pay attention. Even jaywalkers in (say) Mumbai are more sensible. Example (not even in country) is the mad scramble to beat the flashing green man. Or keitai addiction. Or..... I give up, too many to mention.

  • likeitis at 08:56 AM JST - 30th January

    I do not believe that most drivers are cautious enough, so would not put the majority of blame on either.

    Hardly anyone is cautious enough. As for a goal, its a total pipe dream. The point is that these accidents are something like 90 to 95 percent preventable by the pedestrian. The options of the pedestrian are many. Very many. The options of the driver are extremely few. A driver can not jump on the sidewalk to avoid something. A driver cannot stop almost instantly. A driver cannot sidestep. A driver can not make an instant U turn. A driver can not risk bumping the person next to them. A driver cannot hear pedestrians coming. A driver has a limited field of view at all times.

    A driver is locked into going forward for quite a duration and usually has only a few degrees of room to alter his course on the road. Any more than that and they hit the curb, a house, a telephone pole, other cars, pedestrians, etc. etc. A pedestrian can travel on the road, the sidewalk, the field, the parking lot at any angle they please.

    Nearly all the power to prevent these accidents is with the pedestrian. Therefore, I blame the pedestrian most times.

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